BioChar, the Miracle Ingredient for the Organic Garden

Being blessed with many coconut trees, coconut oil is one of the main products of our organic garden. So far, only the shell and the flesh have been used, while the remaining coconut husks have been burned. Considering the fact, the dry season is just about to start, we wanted to try out making biochar out of coconut husks as a soil supplement.

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Biochar adds many benefits to your garden and helps building up a healthy soil. Millions of microscopic holes provide a living environment for many different microorganisms and help holding back plenty of water. Also Nutrients are effectively locked up and are slowly released according to the requirements of the plants. This way, a loss of nutrients caused by too much rain can be prevented. Biochar can also be used in compost toilets, as a water filter or simply as a burning material. 

If you want to use biochar in the garden, it is recommended to saturate the biochar with nutrients before applying to the soil. This can be done by adding biochar during the composting process, mixing with fresh compost or watering it with compost tea. Applying unsaturated biochar directly to the soil could give plants a harder time to grow, because the majority of nutrients may be adsorbed by the char in first place.

The Principles of BioChar Production - Pyrolysis

If you want to make biochar, it is important to understand the physical principles behind the process. If you light up a fire, it is not the wood that burns in first place, but the released gases driven out by heat. The fire will burn these gases in a clear flame consuming all oxygen while forming a protective layer around the wood. As long as there is a lack of oxygen, the wood underneath will carbonize and turn into char. This is called pyrolysis. If no more freshly dried material is added and gases are no longer produced, oxygen can penetrate towards the coal, and the coal will slowly turn to ash. The key point to make biochar is to prevent coal turning into ash while maintaining a clear burn. It’s important to maintain a mostly smoke free fire in order to gain biochar with a good quality and less toxic substances caused by smoke.

To achieve the right process conditions, the physiology of the fire and the geometry of the pit are crucial. Lighting up the fire in a pit or a barrel helps suppressing oxygen flowing from underneath, causing the produced coal to turn to ash. As dry coconut husks are a good material to produce biochar, it can be hard to maintain a clear constant flame by just using husks. Therefore apply easily burnable material just as dry bamboo or wood in the middle of the fire and place the coconut husks around. This creates a chimney effect in the middle that will guarantee a good burning process.

We invite you to read the entire article from our German volunteer Phillip, who, with the help of Ella from Croatia and Evan form Australia demonstrated twice the process of bio charcoaling and enriched our Jiwa Damai soil with this precious fertilizer.

And if you like to visit our garden, or take part in our permaculture workshops, send us an email at contact@jiwadamai.net

I was dreaming about this and am so happy living my dream!

During my journey I met a lot of yogis that have this natural desire to travel and seek and understand the world we live in. Practising Karma Yoga and Seva (selfless service) is a great way to grow in your teachings and meet like-minded volunteers.

With delight and gratitude I’d like to share my experiences of the last four weeks, as a volunteer yoga teacher at Awan Damai, an Earthship inspired build project in the north of Bali, Indonesia.

Read the full story of  Sophie Nusselder , on trueyogareviews.com

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Internships for international students

We are offering individual internships to national and international students and post graduates in various fields. 

We at JiwaDamai, (LaguDamai Foundation) are an Educational Institution which offers trainings, internships and practica to international and national students and graduates.

The fields can be bio-agriculture, permaculture (including construction, sustainable energy, fish and pond maintenance etc), psychology, marketing, hospitality, alternative health care, environmental research and much more. The actual application of the project in a practical setting is an important part of the internship.

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Usually this setting is at JiwaDamai permaculture and retreat center located just twenty minutes outside of Ubud in the district of Mambal.  The lush surroundings of the retreat center include a diverse array of Flora and Fauna that make it an ideal environment for students to be exposed to many different learning opportunities. The cross cultural interaction and tropical climate will give an extra dimension to any internship undertaken with us. Students will have access to local and/or international experts  in their respective fields.

To apply please contact us at:info@jiwadamai.net

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Helping hands

... from our international friends. Our two wonderful volunteers, Laia from Spain Catalan, and Aitor form Equator are engaging in garden work, using the Balinese sickles to clean an area from Tapioka.

Tapioka is eaten as a vegetable, prepared with grated coconut meat.

Thank you for your contribution to Jiwa Damai!

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